The Future of Freedom in Russia

Edited by William J. vanden Heuvel

Based on a conference held at the Library of Congress, this book challenges the current pessimistic view of Russia and invites participants to consider the future of freedom in Russia.

Contributors come from the heart of Russia and describe not only the human dimensions of current problems, but also the inspiring energy, commitment, courage, and genius of countless men and women who will be the unsung founders of the “new Russia.” Speaking to the call for freedom to worship is Father Georgii Edel'shtein, a parish priest in the Orthodox Russian Church, who has served the needs of the poor and oppressed in the remote village of Krabanovo. Arkadii Novikov, creative and successful entrepreneur, discusses how he built his chain of thirteen restaurants in Russia “where no businessman can operate honestly.”

He calls for the new government to establish a legal framework that will encourage both enterprise and integrity. Social activist Boris Pustintsev, president of Citizens' Watch, works for more effective civilian and parliamentary control over Russia's security agencies.

He has spent years in Soviet prisons and labor camps as a result of demonstrations inside Russia in 1956 protesting the invasion of Hungary. Even in democratic Russia he has been the target of the KGB. James H. Billington, the Librarian of Congress, also provides a major statement on freedom in Russia.

Included in the book, along with the voices of personal experience, are specific steps to build a legacy of freedom that will support a vibrant Russian economy in the future. These steps are the encouragement of free enterprise, an independent judiciary, the rule of law, a commitment to freedom of speech and worship, and safeguards for business investment and operation.

The contributions in this landmark volume are by leading Russian academicians and civil society activists, who are waging the day-to-day battle to build a vital Russian civil society. They provide clear evidence that there is, indeed, reason for hope and optimism about the course of change in Russia.

Preface: The Future of Freedom in Russia / vii
William J. vanden Heuvel

Part I: Establishing Freedom Under the Rule of Law

Bring out Your Dead! / 3
Boris Pustintsev

Russia’s Transition to Democracy: Constitutional Justice and the Protection of Civil Liberties / 17
Marat Salikov

Some Historical and Political Aspects of Building a Civil Society in Russia / 48
Sergei Komaritsyn

Russia’s Legal Revolution / 59
Sarah Carey

Part II: Developing the Ethical Underpinnings of a Free-Market Economy Adventures of a Restaurateur / 71
Arkadii Novikov

An Exploration of Optimism and Hope: Junior Achievement in Russia / 79
Nina Kuznetsova

Small Businesses in Russia: A View from Under the Table / 91
Leonid V. Ivanov

Part III: Building a Civil Society

Nurturing a Cherished Garden: The Growth of a Youth Community / 107
Sister Maria Borisova

Building an Ethical Civil Society through Justice / 130
Irina V. Reshetnikova

The Building of a Civil Society and the Media / 142
Larisa Malinova

Foreign Funders and Russian Recipients: Areas of Misunderstanding / 154
Mikhail Kaluzhskii

Part IV: Advancing Freedom of Inquiry and Belief

Advancing Freedom of Belief in Russia / 165
Lawrence A. Uzzell

The Orthodox Russian Church: Issues of Our Times / 176
Father Georgii Edel’shtein

The Advantages of Educational Freedom: New Wine in Old Skins / 192
Andrei Mal’tsev and Kirill Novosel’skii

Conclusion: Freedom, Responsibility, and the Future of Russia / 211
James H. Billington

Appendix: Seven Steps to Prosperity in Russia / 225

Glossary / 235

Index / 237